HRBDT at RightsCon 2017

HRBDT at RightsCon 2017
April 1, 2017 HRBDT
In News

The Human Rights, Big Data and Technology Project was pleased to host two sessions on 30 March at RightsCon 2017.

The first session, ‘(How) Can Algorithms be Human Rights Compliant?’, chaired by Lorna McGregor, explored the risks that algorithmic decision-making pose to human rights. Panellists, Natasha Duarte, Bernard Shen, Ben Wagner and Bruce Schneier, discussed whether, and if so how, methodologically robust algorithms can be designed and developed in a human rights-compliant manner, including examples of what has and has not worked. Panellists also provided their views on the way forward in this complex, interdisciplinary area.

Please see here for more information on this panel.

The second session on ‘Leveraging New Sources of Data for Human Rights Protection without Harming the Individual’, co-hosted with the Centre of Governance and Human Rights at Cambridge University, explored risks to individuals posed by new sources of data for human rights protection. Panellists, Sam Dubberley, Alix Dunn and Lorna McGregor, discussed these risks in relation to three areas: 1) risk to the creator; 2) risk to the object; 3) risk to the human rights researcher, raising the ethical issues that human rights investigators need to bear in mind when approaching new data tools.

Please see here for more information on this panel.

Finally, Daragh Murray also spoke on a panel organised by Amnesty International on ‘Collaborative Models in the Fight against Fake News’, which sought to identify collaborative efforts for verification, explaining its strengths and weaknesses, providing insights into the technical set-up and tools used.

Please see here for more information on this panel.